Activities - Tissue Engineering

The Tissue Engineering SIG is active in:

  • suggesting, organizing, and implementing symposia, workshops, tutorials, and general scientific sessions at the SFB Annual Meeting and other SFB-sponsored meetings
  • providing networking opportunities for researchers who work at the interface between the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering
  • promoting interactions between academia, clinicians, government, and industry in areas that impact tissue engineering
  • enhancing education in the area of biomaterials and tissue engineering, by contributing articles to relevant publications and organizing educational sessions at meetings
  • encouraging members to pursue the highest quality science and to develop the next generation of technologies to bring tissue engineering into wider clinical use
  • collaborating with other SIGs to further the goals of the Society as a whole, and to promote advances in biomedical materials research in a broad range of applications

Following is a list of the Tissue Engineering SIG-sponsored abstract submission categories for the SFB 2022 Annual Meeting:

  • Biomaterials for Organoids
  • Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
  • Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering: from Open Source to Commercial Platforms
  • Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering
  • Biomimetic Hydrogels for Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering Applications

Session Descriptions:

Biomaterials for Organoids: Three-dimensional ex vivo organoid cultures using biomaterial-based assembly and self-assembly have been shown to resemble and recapitulate most of the functionality of diverse multicellular tissues and organs, such as the gut, brain, liver, kidney, and lung. Organoids bridge a gap in existing model systems by providing a more stable system amenable to extended cultivation and manipulation while more representative of in vivo physiology. This session will cover the most recent advancements of biomaterials-mediated organoid and tissue chip technologies in regenerative medicine, cancer therapy, drug testing, environmental control, monitoring, adaptive sensing, and translational applications. This topic was well-received in the 2021 SFB meeting and is an exciting emerging research area. In 2022, we will continue this session and promote translational research to biomaterials-mediated organoid projects' commercial viability.

Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: Stimuli-responsive materials allow for localized on-demand manipulation of the cellular microenvironment, providing unique opportunities to control cell behavior and fate. These responsive material systems have shown promise for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine by enabling spatiotemporally-controlled presentation of mechanical properties, chemical cues, and other microenvironmental features. A variety of triggering stimuli, both exogenous and endogenous, have been explored to control these materials including light, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and magnetic fields, as well as temperature, pH, and various chemical stimuli. This session will highlight recent advances in the development of stimuli-responsive materials for application in tissue engineering and regeneration, including, but not limited to, scaffolds for stem cell control, materials for guiding tissue development, dynamic "4D-patterned" materials, in vitro tissue/disease models, "smart" implantable scaffolds, and stimuli-responsive drug delivery platforms.

Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering: from Open Source to Commercial Platforms: Some of the earliest work in 3D printing for tissue engineering utilized common inkjet printers that were hacked to be able to dispense biomaterial and cells. More recently, increasingly sophisticated technologies to build 3D constructs ranging from extrusion through microfluidics-based dispensing to electro-writing and spinning have been incorporated into commercially available bioprinters. This session will look to explore cutting edge research to develop novel bio-inks, create complex scaffold designs, etc. in the context of applying bioprinting technologies to tissue engineering. Abstracts are encouraged to be submitted by those working with self-built or open source bioprinting platforms as well as from those developing or using advanced commercially available systems. The goal of the session is to demonstrate a diversity of perspectives regarding technology development ranging from academia to industry.

Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering: Regenerative engineering aims to develop functional, bioactive, and instructive biomaterials and approaches for regeneration of tissues through convergence of engineering, medicine, developmental biology, and stem cell science. This symposium will highlight recent trends in development of functional biomaterials that play active role in controlling cellular behaviors and tissue regeneration. We will include different classes of biomaterials such as proteins, polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, fibers, metals, ceramics, and hydrogels for applications in regenerative engineering. The biomaterials that can direct cell fate and promote differentiation will also be highlighted by this session. Moreover, the biomaterials that can facilitate drug delivery and immunomodulation will be covered through oral and poster presentations. Translational strategies for taking these biomaterials from ‘Bench to Bedside’ will also be discussed during the symposium. We expect that our interdisciplinary session including material science, chemistry, biology, engineering, and medicine will be of great significance to the clinicians, industry members and academia.

Biomimetic Hydrogels for Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering Applications: Biomimetic materials draw inspiration from nature for their structure and properties. This session will focus on drug delivery and tissue engineering scaffolds that incorporate bioinspired components for scaffold physical or biological properties. We are soliciting abstracts on research that involves synthetic materials that mimic natural materials or that follow a design motif derived from nature.

Biomaterials for Organoids: Three-dimensional ex vivo organoid cultures using biomaterial-based assembly and self-assembly have been shown to resemble and recapitulate most of the functionality of diverse multicellular tissues and organs, such as the gut, brain, liver, kidney, and lung. Organoids bridge a gap in existing model systems by providing a more stable system amenable to extended cultivation and manipulation while more representative of in vivo physiology. This session will cover the most recent advancements of biomaterials-mediated organoid and tissue chip technologies in regenerative medicine, cancer therapy, drug testing, environmental control, monitoring, adaptive sensing, and translational applications. This topic was well-received in the 2021 SFB meeting and is an exciting emerging research area. In 2022, we will continue this session and promote translational research to biomaterials-mediated organoid projects' commercial viability.

Biomimetic Hydrogels for Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering Applications: Stimuli-responsive materials allow for localized on-demand manipulation of the cellular microenvironment, providing unique opportunities to control cell behavior and fate. These responsive material systems have shown promise for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine by enabling spatiotemporally-controlled presentation of mechanical properties, chemical cues, and other microenvironmental features. A variety of triggering stimuli, both exogenous and endogenous, have been explored to control these materials including light, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and magnetic fields, as well as temperature, pH, and various chemical stimuli. This session will highlight recent advances in the development of stimuli-responsive materials for application in tissue engineering and regeneration, including, but not limited to, scaffolds for stem cell control, materials for guiding tissue development, dynamic "4D-patterned" materials, in vitro tissue/disease models, "smart" implantable scaffolds, and stimuli-responsive drug delivery platforms.

 

Organizers: Jennifer Patterson

Session Title: Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering: from Open Source to Commercial Platforms

Session Description: Some of the earliest work in 3D printing for tissue engineering utilized common inkjet printers that were hacked to be able to dispense biomaterial and cells. More recently, increasingly sophisticated technologies to build 3D constructs ranging from extrusion through microfluidics-based dispensing to electro-writing and spinning have been incorporated into commercially available bioprinters. This session will look to explore cutting edge research to develop novel bio-inks, create complex scaffold designs, etc. in the context of applying bioprinting

technologies to tissue engineering. Abstracts are encouraged to be submitted by those working with self-built or open source bioprinting platforms as well as from those developing or using advanced commercially available systems. The goal of the session is to demonstrate a diversity of perspectives regarding technology development ranging from academia to industry.

 

Organizers: Gulden Camci-Unal, Qun Wang

Session Title: Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering

Session Description: Regenerative engineering aims to develop functional, bioactive, and instructive biomaterials and approaches for regeneration of tissues through convergence of engineering, medicine, developmental biology, and stem cell science. This symposium will highlight recent trends in development of functional biomaterials that play active role in controlling cellular behaviors and tissue regeneration. We will include different classes of biomaterials such as proteins, polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, fibers, metals, ceramics, and hydrogels for applications in regenerative engineering. The biomaterials that can direct cell fate and promote differentiation will also be highlighted by this session. Moreover, the biomaterials that can facilitate drug delivery and immunomodulation will be covered through oral and poster presentations. Translational strategies for taking these biomaterials from ‘Bench to Bedside’ will also be discussed during the symposium. We expect that our interdisciplinary session including material science, chemistry, biology, engineering, and medicine will be of great significance to the clinicians, industry members, and academia.

 

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SFB News

The Biomaterials Forum Third Quarter 2021 issue is now available online!